BBC’s The Apprentice: on Gin Branding

BBC’s The Apprentice: what they could have done differently?

I have a confession to make…hello my name is Northern Munkee and I’m a big fan of The BBC’s The Apprentice.

Yes, I join the millions of viewers each week who scream in unison at their TV sets offering advice to budding entrepreneurs seeking to earn Lord Sugar’s affections (and a £250k investment).

Now, just to be clear this post is not designed to criticise any of the candidates. The process isn’t something I’d want to go through and I have a great deal of respect for those that do; they are all great business people in their own right. However, when a foodie task like this week’s arises it would be remiss of me not to consider what they could have done differently.

For those with busy Thursday nights or haven’t had the chance to catch up on iPlayer I won’t give anything away regarding the Final 5 – I promise. The premise of the task was to develop a new gin brand and product to pitch to three teams of booze buyers.

I just want to call out three areas that I believe both teams could have done differently: the product, the brand and the pitch.

northernmunkeebites.ginbrand.png

The Product 

So, let’s skip to over the ‘puddle-coloured’ product; we all know it’s wrong and the poor girl got enough stick for that.

Anybody that’s been to a food festival this year will know that we’re in the midst of a gin revolution; which means the palates of the early-adopting populous are becoming more discerning when it comes to gin. They are, therefore, not easy to fool.

Although one team clearly outperformed the other in product terms, they both went into the task blind. Unless you’re a gin expert how can you understand what’s popular, what’s on trend and what’s a dog. I’m confident that some superficial market research would have prevented some of the initial mistakes. A great quote from the show was ‘don’t be unique for unique’s sake’ – priceless.

The Brand

Now, I have some real sympathy here. Creating a brand to sell to Tesco shouldn’t be achievable in a month, let alone a morning so I fully appreciate the restrictions imposed on the teams. That being said, they didn’t seem to be in danger of stumbling upon on the next Innocent!

A brand is an emotional entity and needs to inspire people to get behind your cause. Difficulties with pronunciation and a haunting history weren’t about to drive the gin-drinking hipsters to buy ‘Colony’ or ‘Giin’. The ‘Colony’ camp did at least attempt to add some texture to their brand and created a credible backstory but, if we’re honest, it was doomed from the outset.

The Pitch

I’m afraid I have to be a little critical here, although I do fully appreciate how intimidating any pitch can be; let alone when you’re put on the spot and have a TV camera thrust in your face. Both teams pitches lacked any sort of structure and cohesion even though they did enjoy some success. If you feel you need more than one person to present then it is integral that you assign clear roles and responsibilities as opposed to having three people telling one story.

A strong sales pitch is composed of experts: a brand expert, a category/market expert and a customer expert. You’ll note that I haven’t listed a ‘sales expert’ there. My view is that you shouldn’t need to sell in the classical sense; you should never need to ask for an order because you’ve understood your customer, identified an opportunity or issue and your proposal presents the perfect (and collaborative) solution.

northernmunkeebites-quickguide

So to summarise this post, let’s look at what we can learn from this episode:

  • The Product: do your research and if you intend to develop a unique product make sure you have a reason for doing it
  • The Brand: seek to inspire people to create fans not customers
  • The Pitch: create a pitch composed of experts but leave the sales expert in the office

So that concludes my TV-inspired post, be sure to check out my latest guest post on branding for Smoothie PR; and before you go don’t forget to leave me a comment on this post to let me know what you thought of the episode.

Northern Munkee.

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Key Food Trends in the UK…

Focus on SIAL: Review

Over the last week or so I have been focussing my attentions on Paris and SIAL: the world’s largest food innovation exhibition.

Innovation is the lifeblood of food retail as it drives new shoppers, new interests, new sales and new opportunities. There has been a plethora of game changing innovations over the last few years that have redefined food retailing in one way or another: bottled water, the shelf check-out, home delivery, micro-meals, vaping…the list is endless.

So, in the spirit of SIAL, I’m going to give my view of the world of retail and food innovation and then review some of the new insights that came out of the conference.

Sustainability

This has been a hot topic in the food industry for a long time and probably always will be. Sustainability can mean different things to different people but in its simplest form it’s a means to ensuring that we have longevity in supply of food. That can be achieved through fair wages and working conditions, exploring renewable energies or protecting the environment that produces the food. I wrote on this subject in a previous blog and in particular about how manufacturers are turning away from organisations, like the Fairtrade Foundation, in search of a more effective way of creating a sustainable supply chain.

In commercial terms, sustainability is still important to shoppers which can be evidenced from campaigns like The Grocer’s Waste Not Want Not. Suppliers should be mindful of their sustainability stance and can use it for commercial gain such as the multiple retailers’ adoption of ‘wonky veg’ to win hearts and minds.

Food Waste

I touched on this point briefly above but, as odd as this may sound, the management of food waste is becoming more and more trendy. This is partly driven by social awareness and hardship programs like Fair Share and also a socio-economic drive to stop throwing money down the drain through negligence and ignorance.

This trend has seen brands such as Toast Ale, beer made from surplus bread, to emerge. Now, I’m not claiming this is a new trend, far from it; the practice has existed for hundreds of years since fruit manufacturers wanted to preserve their wares in sugar to make jam or potato farmers wanted an outlet for surplus potatoes in a snacking format. What I am saying is that this concept and story is now becoming a commercial opportunity.

Dot Com

Online food shopping is something that has been growing steadily year after year in the UK but there has to be a significant leap forward in the near future that will be a game changer. If I was a betting man I’d say that is more than likely going to come from Jeff Bezos et al over at Amazon where drones are already lining up laden with groceries. Amazon will steal a march on the grocery sector, it’s just a matter of time.

For now, companies like Deliveroo will continue to innovate and do things differently and better than before but surely no one can beat the Amazonian beast to the online food retailing crown?

Flavour Trends

Flavour trends are really difficult to predict and if I could tell you the difference between a flash in the pan and a sticky trend I’d be a very rich man!

Flavour and food trends tend to be driven by social elements like which holiday destinations are popular at the time and therefore it changes frequently, almost on a yearly basis. One trend that is definitely here to stay in the UK is provenance. We are still obsessed by where our food comes from to keep a check on traceability and quality.

Health is still prominent on the trend agenda in the UK and the movement over the last 18 months has seen protein come into the limelight. Is this trend a sticky one? I think not but only time will tell.

Now that my soap box is well worn I’ll move on to take a look at the World Tour studies produced by SIAL with a focus on what we can expect in the UK.

World Tour Studies: UK Trends

Three Key Food Trends:

Coconutty – Daniel Selwood (journalist for The Grocer magazine) highlights Pip&Nut (which I wrote about in a previous blog) as the key brand in this trend. He highlights that British shoppers are looking for products with functional benefits and coconut proliferations will be around for the next few years.

No Carbs – Selwood also calls out the British quest for a tasty alternative to a carbohydrate accompaniment which has led to a whole raft of innovative pasta/noodle/potato alternatives.

Super Snacking – this review also comments on the snacking revolution that is well underway in the UK with lifestyle champions on the search for more tasty and more beneficial snacks. Selwood highlights popcorn as a key trend along with a range of new snacking options brought by brands like Graze.

Trends in Retail

This report offers a few juicy nuggets in terms of what to watch in the retail market with Amazon Fresh, Holland & Barrett driving change in the arena.

So all that leaves me to ask is what are your food or retail trends for 2017 that you want to highlight? Come on people, sharing is caring.

Northern Munkee.

Dairy Free Drinks…

Focus on SIAL: Rebel Kitchen

Over the next week I will be focussing my attentions on Paris and SIAL: the world’s largest food innovation exhibition.

Innovation is the lifeblood of food retail as it drives new shoppers, new interests, new sales and new opportunities. There has been a plethora of game changing innovations over the last few years that have redefined food retailing in one way or another: bottled water, the shelf check-out, home delivery, micro-meals, vaping…the list is endless.

So, in the spirit of SIAL, I’m going to give my view of the world of retail and food innovation before I adjust my focus to an exhibitor at the conference in Paris.

Sustainability

This has been a hot topic in the food industry for a long time and probably always will be. Sustainability can mean different things to different people but in its simplest form it’s a means to ensuring that we have longevity in supply of food. That can be achieved through fair wages and working conditions, exploring renewable energies or protecting the environment that produces the food. I wrote on this subject in a previous blog and in particular about how manufacturers are turning away from organisations, like the Fairtrade Foundation, in search of a more effective way of creating a sustainable supply chain.

In commercial terms, sustainability is still important to shoppers which can be evidenced from campaigns like The Grocer’s Waste Not Want Not. Suppliers should be mindful of their sustainability stance and can use it for commercial gain such as the multiple retailers’ adoption of ‘wonky veg’ to win hearts and minds.

Food Waste

I touched on this point briefly above but, as odd as this may sound, the management of food waste is becoming more and more trendy. This is partly driven by social awareness and hardship programs like Fair Share and also a socio-economic drive to stop throwing money down the drain through negligence and ignorance.

This trend has seen brands such as Toast Ale, beer made from surplus bread, to emerge. Now, I’m not claiming this is a new trend, far from it; the practice has existed for hundreds of years since fruit manufacturers wanted to preserve their wares in sugar to make jam or potato farmers wanted an outlet for surplus potatoes in a snacking format. What I am saying is that this concept and story is now becoming a commercial opportunity.

Dot Com

Online food shopping is something that has been growing steadily year after year in the UK but there has to be a significant leap forward in the near future that will be a game changer. If I was a betting man I’d say that is more than likely going to come from Jeff Bezos et al over at Amazon where drones are already lining up laden with groceries. Amazon will steal a march on the grocery sector, it’s just a matter of time.

For now, companies like Deliveroo will continue to innovate and do things differently and better than before but surely no one can beat the Amazonian beast to the online food retailing crown?

Flavour Trends

Flavour trends are really difficult to predict and if I could tell you the difference between a flash in the pan and a sticky trend I’d be a very rich man!

Flavour and food trends tend to be driven by social elements like which holiday destinations are popular at the time and therefore it changes frequently, almost on a yearly basis. One trend that is definitely here to stay in the UK is provenance. We are still obsessed by where our food comes from to keep a check on traceability and quality.

Health is still prominent on the trend agenda in the UK and the movement over the last 18 months has seen protein come into the limelight. Is this trend a sticky one? I think not but only time will tell.

Now that my soap box is well worn, I’ll introduce my SIAL 2016 exhibitor focus for today…

northernmunkeebites-rebelkitchen1

Rebel Kitchen

Who are they?

Rebel Kitchen is a husband (Ben) and wife (Tamara) team on a food mission that can be best summed up by their story: A permanent healthy state of rebellion means we’re always seeking newer and better ways of doing things. Reject ‘how it is’; tell the ‘that’ll never workers’ where to go and never settle.

The brand is very on trend and acts as the physical embodiment of the health movement within the UK at the moment.

Why are they innovative?

Rebel Kitchen is riding on the crest of a wave of a coconut-health trend and making all the right moves. The flavours aren’t overly complicated but they deliver against a healthy shoppers expectations and they even make the transition into the mainstream shopping basket through clever and effective branding.

Now, I’m not your stereotypical coconutter but Rebel Kitchen’s Mylks are just brilliant. There isn’t anything pretentious about them. It’s just good quality drinking.

Why should you love them?

Rebel Kitchen’s success, in my opinion, is down to the cleverly crafted brand identity. The principles put in place by Ben and Tamara have set a solid platform to build a product portfolio and a movement that will be around for a while.

I’ve passed judgement on some healthy foods in previous blogs which have completely missed the point and forgotten to be, firstly, great tasting. This is where Rebel Kitchen differ: they are starting with great food and making sure it’s simple and good for you. Good work!

Details: www.rebel-kitchen.com

SIAL Location: 2L 047 National Pavilions and Regions of the World

So all that leaves me to ask is what are your food or retail trends for 2017 that you want to highlight? Come on people, sharing is caring.

Northern Munkee.

A Game Changing Snack…

Focus on SIAL: Propercorn

Over the next couple of weeks I will be focussing my attentions on Paris and SIAL: the world’s largest food innovation exhibition.

Innovation is the lifeblood of food retail as it drives new shoppers, new interests, new sales and new opportunities. There has been a plethora of game changing innovations over the last few years that have redefined food retailing in one way or another: bottled water, the shelf check-out, home delivery, micro-meals, vaping…the list is endless.

So, in the spirit of SIAL, I’m going to give my view of the world of retail and food innovation before I adjust my focus to an exhibitor at the conference in Paris.

Sustainability

This has been a hot topic in the food industry for a long time and probably always will be. Sustainability can mean different things to different people but in its simplest form it’s a means to ensuring that we have longevity in supply of food. That can be achieved through fair wages and working conditions, exploring renewable energies or protecting the environment that produces the food. I wrote on this subject in a previous blog and in particular about how manufacturers are turning away from organisations, like the Fairtrade Foundation, in search of a more effective way of creating a sustainable supply chain.

In commercial terms, sustainability is still important to shoppers which can be evidenced from campaigns like The Grocer’s Waste Not Want Not. Suppliers should be mindful of their sustainability stance and can use it for commercial gain such as the multiple retailers’ adoption of ‘wonky veg’ to win hearts and minds.

Food Waste

I touched on this point briefly above but, as odd as this may sound, the management of food waste is becoming more and more trendy. This is partly driven by social awareness and hardship programs like Fair Share and also a socio-economic drive to stop throwing money down the drain through negligence and ignorance.

This trend has seen brands such as Toast Ale, beer made from surplus bread, to emerge. Now, I’m not claiming this is a new trend, far from it; the practice has existed for hundreds of years since fruit manufacturers wanted to preserve their wares in sugar to make jam or potato farmers wanted an outlet for surplus potatoes in a snacking format. What I am saying is that this concept and story is now becoming a commercial opportunity.

Dot Com

Online food shopping is something that has been growing steadily year after year in the UK but there has to be a significant leap forward in the near future that will be a game changer. If I was a betting man I’d say that is more than likely going to come from Jeff Bezos et al over at Amazon where drones are already lining up laden with groceries. Amazon will steal a march on the grocery sector, it’s just a matter of time.

For now, companies like Deliveroo will continue to innovate and do things differently and better than before but surely no one can beat the Amazonian beast to the online food retailing crown?

Flavour Trends

Flavour trends are really difficult to predict and if I could tell you the difference between a flash in the pan and a sticky trend I’d be a very rich man!

Flavour and food trends tend to be driven by social elements like which holiday destinations are popular at the time and therefore it changes frequently, almost on a yearly basis. One trend that is definitely here to stay in the UK is provenance. We are still obsessed by where our food comes from to keep a check on traceability and quality.

Health is still prominent on the trend agenda in the UK and the movement over the last 18 months has seen protein come into the limelight. Is this trend a sticky one? I think not but only time will tell.

Now that my soap box is well worn, I’ll introduce my SIAL 2016 exhibitor focus for today…

Propercorn

Who are they?

Just in case you’ve been living under a rock for the last six years. Propercorn is an innovative snacks business co-founded by Ryan Kohn and Cassandra Stavrou. Propercorn has led a mini snacking-revolution and transformed the market space with its premium popcorn brand.

Why are they innovative?

Propercorn had first-mover’s advantage in the premium popcorn category and has, to date, done it better than anybody else. Since 2010 they have enjoyed astronomical success and yearly growth but now is the time to diversify. Crunch Corn is Propercorn’s new sub-brand which propels the business into a new category, snacks and nuts, with a half-popped corn product.

Innovation is a key market driver in this category and I truly believe that Propercorn have developed a game changing product. It tastes fantastic, is healthy and hits on a number of key cues demanded by the snacking populous.

Why should you love them?

Propercorn just do things differently. Following in the footsteps of Vita Coco and Red Bull, they have worked hard to create a lifestyle brand that is more than just a food but a statement. If you haven’t looked into Propercorn yet you really should stop whatever you’re doing and go and find some…now!

Details: www.propercorn.com

SIAL Location: JK 001 National Pavilions and Regions of the World

So all that leaves me to ask is what are your food or retail trends for 2017 that you want to highlight? Come on people, sharing is caring.

Northern Munkee.

A Food Tour of Scotland

Scottish Food and Drink: Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee

Scotland has always been a hotbed of food and drink innovation with a rich, fertile environment to rear the tastiest Aberdeen Angus and more premium gin than you can shake a haggis at. In recent times Scottish revolutionaries such as Flavourly subscription boxes and Thistly Cross Cider have led the way in the food and drink movement.

With all this rich food heritage I take any opportunity I can to explore Scottish food and drink so I thought I’d enjoy a small tour around Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee; check out the places I found…

Eatery: V Deep

Location: Leith, Edinburgh

Style: Craft Ale & Indian Street Eat/ Tapas

Avg Price Per Head: £25 (two courses plus drinks)

Ambience: if you’re after a traditional Indian eating experience with tired flock wallpaper and barely audible Bollywood soundtracks then Hardeep Singh Kohli’s V Deep is not for you. It’s loud, bustling and energising with quirky décor made from up cycled doors, bottle tops and chick pea tins. The exterior is unassuming in an area of Leith I’d describe as ‘up and coming’ with high rise apartments out of one window and trendy wine bar through the other.

Appeals to: food adventurers, group eaters and trend seekers

Quick Review:

Now, I made the mistake (sorry gents) of going to V Deep with two experienced chefs who were seeking the traditional Indian experience – and therefore they were disappointed. I however, love this place. The haggis naan breads, well fried pakoras and decadent curries were incredible. I’ve also started to measure eateries on their selection of alcohol and anywhere that serves Thistly Cross Whisky Cask is a winner in my opinion! At first the notion of Indian Tapas may seem like an unlikely fusion but imagine going out with a group of friends and passing the foils between you, beers flowing and music blaring – what a great way to spend a few hours!

Eatery: Bo’Vine

Location: Glasgow, West End

Style: Steakhouse

Avg Price Per Head: £15 (two courses plus drinks)

Ambience: the room was dimly lit with a quiet and moody ambience, I thought it was bordering on being pretentious until I heard ‘Hey Joe’ through the speakers and then I knew I’d be in for a treat!

Appeals to: meat eaters, fine diners and steak aficionados

Quick Review:

It’s been a long time since I’ve had a good steak served just how I asked for it but the grilled Sirloin here was absolute perfection; the creamy pepper sauce added a great juxtaposition to the sweet cherry tomatoes it was served alongside. Although I would ordinarily seek out a Thistly Cider, I can’t grace a good steak with anything but a nice, smooth Malbec and Bo’Vine certainly delivered the goods with the wine menu. The service I received was super fast without being overbearing and I was amazed at the price when I got my bill: starter, main and a large glass of wine for £15 – what type of sorcery is this?!

Eatery: The Beer Kitchen

Location: Dundee

Style: Traditional/Comfort

Avg Price Per Head: £25 (two courses plus drinks)

Ambience: the room was very open, light and trendy with wooden furnishings adorning every nook and cranny. The ambience was very laid back and chilled with a selection of neo soul setting the scene for a great meal

Appeals to: most foodies with an appetite for good food and drink

Quick Review:

Given that this is an Innis&Gunn establishment you’d expect the drinks menu to be incredible – and it is. Obviously, I elected for a Thistly Cross Whisky Cask. The food, although fairly simple on the surface, was fantastic. I started with a savoury haggis donut that was complimented by crisped seasonal vegetables and a sublime bone marrow aioli. My main course was a succulent lamb rump with creatively cooked vegetables and a rich, smoky gravy that gave the whole dish a new dimension.

So that concludes my short jaunt around Scotland and I have to say: Scottish Food and Drink, take a bow; just don’t bow too deep, I’m not keen on discovering whether you’re a true Scotsman or not! I have a great deal of respect for a fine Scottish menu and these are three eateries I can definitely recommend that you try.

That just leaves me to ask for some feedback from foodie friends for recommendations of more Scottish eateries I need to seek out. Also don’t forget to check out my tour around Merseyside I wrote for Foodies100.

Northern Munkee.

Superseed Granola Breakfast

Product Review: Troo Foods Granola

This is a breakfast-inspired blog and one that is close to my heart as I started off life in the commercial world working for one of the biggest breakfast food companies in the world.

They say that breakfast is the most important meal of the day but it is fast becoming the most forgotten meal of the day. I’m not suggesting that the trend is that people have stopped eating breakfast; however I am suggesting that it’s not a meal any more. The days of sitting around the table to eat breakfast are all but gone except may be on weekend, instead people are yearning for a more convenient and faster way to consume their morning meal. This trend has contributed to the success of cereal bars, breakfast biscuits and breakfast drinks.

I am a big believer in market innovation to drive interest and new shoppers so there’s no doubt that the explosion of on-the-go options has driven the category forward but I want to see innovation driven by creativity not convenience. The Grocer published a great article this summer in their breakfast feature which demonstrated some inspirational developments including a fresh take on black pudding!

There is a ray of hope for the breakfast occasion that’s being driven by health conscious audience as demonstrated in Eat Yourself Skinny’s blog.

Granola is playing a key role in this new movement with its versatile uses we just need more market innovators like Troo, a fresh granola subscription service, to come to the party…

Troo Superseed Granola

Rating: 8.5/10

Packaging

Now it’s safe to say that I have never seen granola packaged like this before, but I have to say I love it. The ‘sealed-in-freshness’ appeal of the coffee-style packaging really adds to the appeal and branding. I also think the faintly stamped roundel calls up connotations of adventure and the exotic. I would question how this packaging would translate onto a retailer’s shelf (mainstream or specialist) as it isn’t clear what the product is or what it’s unique selling points are. However, as something that is intended to be received in the post I think it’s brilliant.

Price

£6.99 (monthly subscription)– this is definitely market appropriate. A mainstream granola or cluster-based cereal can cost up to £4 for 200g so I have no issue with being charged a slight premium for a far superior product.

Delivery

This is fantastic! The granola delivered a fantastic juxtaposition of textures and flavours from a generous blend of sweet, soft fruits and crunchy nuts and seeds. These notes were interspersed with a smooth, creaminess that developed from the oats and milk.

The final twist in the journey that this product took me on was an overarching cinnamon burst that held all the individual components together with a soft, sweet warmth. What a brilliant way to start the day!

Verdict – in a word, kick-starter! Breakfast doesn’t have to be a functional time of the day as there are now so many options available to us. As a foodie make a promise to yourself that you’ll plan your breakfast meal with as much consideration and care as you do an evening meal just once a week. Try something new, something healthy and treat yourself to a food smile at the start of the day!

Details: http://www.troogranola.com/

So all that leaves me is to ask: what’s your favourite way to eat granola? Come on folks, leave me a comment below because sharing is caring.

Also, before you go take a look at my blog on another fantastic granola I reviewed earlier in the year; it offers something completely different to Troo but is just as inspiring!

Northern Munkee.

Gluten-Free BBQ Times!

BBQ Mini-Series: The Black Farmer

So, it’s officially the British summer and it’s that time when we fellas refuse to wear sun cream, go an offensive shade of puce and revert back to our Neanderthal instincts by making a fire to burn meat on.

I love BBQ season but living in the UK makes it tough to predict and event more difficult for retailers, producers and eateries to plan for. However each year the offering keeps on getting better and better and the categories that the BBQ occasion spans is ever increasing. We would now happily shop the meat aisles, bakery, salad section, spices, oils, condiments and, of course, the booze aisle. BBQ is much more than a category in retail; it’s an occasion, a mood, an ambience and something that the whole nation, nay the world, goes crazy for.

BBQ has increased in popularity over the last few years with the explosion of street food trucks and festivals that have shown the common household cook what is possible with a fire, a hotplate and a bit of food soul. If we get invited round to a friends for a Saturday afternoon Barbie it’s no longer acceptable to serve salmonella sausages or botulism burgers. Now we expect brioche buns, sliders, low and slow briskets, sliders, kofte, shawarmas and a fabulous infusion of world flavours and tastes all on an undersized paper plate.

Now, I’m good with a pair of tongs and a hotplate but I don’t profess to being an expert by any stretch so I’d recommend you check out the BBQ Geeks for some absolutely top tips and the perfect BBQ.

This mini-series explores some of the new and great products and recipes that I’ve foraged and found this year to make Britain’s BBQ season great. So, even if we need to turn to supplements rather than the sun for our vitamin D, we can always enjoy well-cooked, well-seasoned and well-complimented meat.

The Black Farmer Gluten Free Meats

northernmunkeebites.theblackfarmer1.jpg

Rating: 9/10

Packaging

The packaging employed by The Black Farmer is simple, on trend and effective. I do believe the front of the packaging could do more to inform the shopper some of the products’ biggest selling points: Wilfred’s heritage, the quality of meat used and the fact it is a free-from. These are all called out but, in my opinion, should make more a bang than a sly whistle.

Price

£2.00 – for the size and quality of this products this is a steal and could certainly demand a higher price point if The Black Farmer chose to. There has been a great influx of premium meats into the chiller from smaller suppliers and therefore the market is challenging and the bun fight over shelf-tickets is getting more vicious.

Delivery

Premium Pork Sausages

These sausages were phenomenal. The skin was soft and just burst on first bite releasing fantastically seasoned, juicy sausage meat. The absence of oats in the recipe produced a brilliant flavour profile surpassing any banger I’ve had before!

Beef Burgers

This is a really simple product but it really delivers. The meat is light and floral without grease and fat overpowering.

Beef and Cheese Burgers

Now these bovine beauties were the best of the bunch. The mature cheddar cheese added a delicate layer of delicousness beneath the brilliant quality meat. Perfect!

Verdict – in a word, juicy! As a gluten-evader (I don’t completely cut it out although I should) I think The Black Farmer has done an awesome job, certainly in terms of producing great quality meat. This review has been a very apt way to close my BBQ mini-series, thank you to Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones.

Details: www.theblackfarmer.com

So all that leaves me is to ask: what’s your favourite BBQ recipe, tip or trick? Come on folks, leave me a comment below because sharing is caring.

Also, before you go take a look at my blog on a fantastic condiment I reviewed earlier in the year; it’s the perfect accompaniment to any pork dish.

Northern Munkee.